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Gagosian Gallery

What's on: Hollywood is a Verb

Gagosian Gallery

The oddly compelling, disjointed grammar in the title of this predominantly photographic group exhibition (until 20 December) is spelled out in a classic 1979 pastel by Ed Ruscha. Displayed alongside are early LA inspired etchings and drawings by David Hockney, typically intense, complex photographs by Dennis Hopper, a pair of Bruce Nauman multiples, vintage, black and white stills by Cindy Sherman, a late Andy Warhol painting and more recent works by Maurizio Cattelan, Philip-Lorca DiCorcia, Dexter Dalwood, Douglas Gordon and Glen Seator. Each responds in their own way to the urban landscape of Los Angeles and comments on the inescapable idea of Hollywood as a cinematic "dream factory". What engages our attention, among so many artists from different generations, are both the marked shifts in perception we might expect—from Ruscha’s cool deployment of the language of signs and Hockney’s celebration of a new-found sexual and artistic freedom, or the classic "film noir" element of Hoppers’s images, through Sherman’s impersonation of standard female film roles and DiCorcia’s focus on passers-by as protagonists in unknown dramas, to the increasingly ironic stances of younger artists—and the unexpected parallels. Gordon’s appropriated and "blinded" portraits of by-gone Hollywood stars (above) mediates Warhol’s obsession with stardom through mordant humour. (Prices on application)